FAQs

Why should I instruct a barrister?
What is the difference between a Public Access barrister and a normal barrister?
What work can a barrister do?
What work can a barrister not do under Public Access?
Is a barrister obliged to accept Public Access work?
Can a public access barrister work on legal aid (Legal Services Commission)?
What is non-contentious and contentious work?
Where do barristers practise?
Do I have to pay up front?
How do I pay?

Why should I instruct a barrister?

Barristers are specialist legal advisers and courtroom advocates recognised internationally for their independence and objectivity and are trained to advise clients on the strengths as well as the weaknesses of their case. They have specialist knowledge and experience in and out of court, which can make a substantial difference to the outcome of a case. You will also benefit from cost and speed of response.
back to top

What is the difference between a Public Access barrister and a normal barrister?

Public Access barristers do what barristers always do: provide specialist legal advice, draft legal documents including documents needed during litigation, and provide specialist representation and advocacy before courts and other tribunals.
back to top

What work can a barrister do?

back to top

What work can a barrister not do under Public Access?

A barrister’s code of conduct prevents him or her from doing some work principal among them is to conduct litigation on your behalf. Ross will be able to advise you of the limitations.
back to top

Is a barrister obliged to accept Public Access work?

A barrister may choose not to accept Public Access work at all. In deciding whether to accept instructions, a barrister is entitled to, and must in fact, consider whether that case is suitable for Public Access.

The Bar Code of Conduct requires a barrister to refuse to accept instructions if he or she considers that it is in your interests or in the interests of justice for you to instruct a solicitor or other professional person.
back to top

Can a public access barrister work on legal aid (Legal Services Commission)?

No. Barristers are not able to accept work, which is paid by legal aid (paid by Legal Services Commission). This is because the Legal Services Commission does not allow a barrister to apply for funding on your behalf.
back to top

What is non-contentious and contentious work?

Work that is transactional in nature and doesn’t involve a dispute is generally described as non-contentious. For example it may involve the drafting of a lease or will. Conversely contentious work involves a dispute, which can end up in court.
back to top

Where do barristers practise?

Barristers are individual practitioners who work in groups of offices known as chambers, which are situated in cities and towns throughout England and Wales.
back to top

Do I have to pay up front?

It depends on what you agree with Ross’ clerk when agreeing the fee for the work. You will need to discuss with the clerk when the fee becomes payable but normally the fee is payable in full at the time the service is provided. Thus if Ross provides an opinion upon the merits of your case the fee is due at the time the opinion is supplied.
back to top

How do I pay?

Generally Ross accepts payment by cheque, however he also accepts electronic payment. The details of this will be set out in the client care letter.
back to top